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LOCO CHOICE

HauteSaoneFrance

Joined: 2-01-14

Topics: 27

Replies: 91

Posted: Sat 15th Feb 2014, 6:40pm
LOCO CHOICE

I'm sure that this incredibly bad weather we're experiencing is forcing many to be 'armchair' enthusiasts? My excuse is that I'm very new on here and my proposed new railway site in France is 550 miles from where I am now at my Bristol home, I am however going to visit soon and will take that opportunity to do a site survey to establish ground heights, I have a feeling that it's going to be a struggle to keep within acceptable gradients? This leads me to a question as regards choice of Loco, I have already decided that for a start I will not be too ambitious and opt for a shunter type loco, the question is whether it should be a battery electric, petrol electric or petrol hydraulic? the latter mentioned appeals to me and available loco's seem to be at the weightier end of the scale which I assume will give better adhesion, my feeling is that weight and power may well go hand in hand for my aspirations? I'm aware that stopping is an issue and it seems that it might be good practice to include braking on rolling stock too? I'm looking to buy ready built and ready to run and have already identified possible suppliers but would not expect the Society to endorse any particular commercial organisation but general advice will be very much appreciated

 

Replies To This Post

MartynRedfearn

Joined: 1-01-94

Topics: 16

Replies: 107

Posted: Sat 15th Feb 2014, 7:27pm

I know I am recommending a different source but have you had a look at Facebook? https://www.facebook.com/groups/MinimalGaugeRailways/
https://www.facebook.com/groups/7.14.railways/
https://www.facebook.com/groups/290926811044791/
https://www.facebook.com/groups/miniaturerailwaysuppliers/

It does depend on whether you want to go scale standard gauge, narrow gauge or even minimum gauge. If you go narrow/minimal you can ride on to add to the traction. Petrol electric is cheaper than both hydraulic or battery electric in the long run, but in terms of off the shelf, there are more battery electrics or petrol hydraulics on offer than petrol electrics.
 

HauteSaoneFrance

Joined: 2-01-14

Topics: 27

Replies: 91

Posted: Sat 15th Feb 2014, 8:23pm

Hi Martyn and thanks for the ever so quick reply, I don't fully understand the difference between scale, Standard, Narrow or Minimum gauge? though I deduce that scale is a proportion of the full size loco? What attracted me to 7.1/4 in the first place is that it affords 'sit in' rather than 'sit on' as would be the case with say 5inch gauge? I'm definitely leaning towards the heavier end of the scale and realising that 7.1/4 is the way to go short of having a lot of space and money too !
 

Xz

Joined: 1-01-92

Topics: 17

Replies: 244

Posted: Sat 15th Feb 2014, 10:16pm

'Standard Gauge' would be a model of something like a main line locomotive, i.e from 4ft 8-1/2". Narrow Gauge would be modelling something akin to the smaller Welsh slate quarry railways such the Talyllyn, or the Ffestiniog (2ft, 2ft 3in, 2ft 6in, 3ft 6in etc. etc.). These will be far more towards your way of thinking than Standard Gauge. Minimum gauge is much harder to define in that basically it tries to provide as much capacity as the rail-gauge, in our case 7-1/4", will cope, and doesn't necessarily follow any existing prototype. These are broad descriptions and there can be many variations in between.
 

MartynRedfearn

Joined: 1-01-94

Topics: 16

Replies: 107

Posted: Sun 16th Feb 2014, 8:12am

This photo gives you some idea, with two standard gauge locos (admittedly both American loading gauge so a little bigger than a British standard gauge), a Thomas II narrow gauge loco and Victoria which is narrow gauge but as big as you can go.  Minimal is where you have designed it purely for 7 1/4 and not scaled from a prototype.
This photo gives you some idea, with two standard gauge locos (admittedly both American loading gauge so a little bigger than a British standard gauge), a Thomas II narrow gauge loco and Victoria which is narrow gauge but as big as you can go. Minimal is where you have designed it purely for 7 1/4 and not scaled from a prototype.
 
 
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