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Nomenclature

George Coles

Joined: 4-08-09

Topics: 19

Replies: 90

Posted: Tue 9th May 2017, 8:07am
Nomenclature

Nomenclature
I have just been reading one of our member societies guidance notes for those using their railway. I found it very confusing. Whilst one cannot expect 'media' people to be able to tell the difference, one would hope that model engineers with an interest in railways would know that a train is something that trails behind (e.g. a bridal train)
Am I alone in this?
 

Replies To This Post

terryrobinson

Joined: 1-01-82

Topics: 1

Replies: 6

Posted: Tue 9th May 2017, 10:25am

Absolutely correct George, but then we have the Flying Scotsman, is it a train or an engine !!

Terry
 

Peter Beevers

Joined: 9-10-01

Topics: 3

Replies: 134

Posted: Tue 9th May 2017, 2:17pm

As a professional in the rail industry, nomenclature is very important, and has very specific meanings. The 'enthusiast/hobbyist' community do my profession a great disservice by abusing those terms, whether it be via ignorance or sheer bloody mindedness.
Sadly, the examples you quote are almost entriely wrong.
An engine is a device which turns power into rotary motion. It may be a part of a locomotive, which is a powered railway vehicle used for pulling trains. Do not confuse the two!!
A train is a set of one or more railway vehicles, which is moved either by a locomotive or inbuilt motors (so it can, by definition, be a locomotive alone).
I hope this closes this down succinctly and quickly and that people will, in future, respect the industry that 4 previous generations of my family has worked hard to support.
 

johndoyle

Joined: 15-12-99

Topics: 6

Replies: 21

Posted: Fri 12th May 2017, 4:41pm

As a hobby, I don't really mind what people call the 'thing' as long as I know what they are referring to.

Or should this reply be in the 'ENGINES and rolling stock' section of the forum.....
 

George Coles

Joined: 4-08-09

Topics: 19

Replies: 90

Posted: Sat 13th May 2017, 6:10am

Thanks John. I started this because I WAS confused. The societies guidance notes to which I referred, stated that secondary couplings (e.g. chains) should be fitted between "the train and the driving truck" and went on to refer to couplings between the driving truck and the coaches. In another place in the notes it states that the brakes fitted to the loco or driving truck should be capable of stopping the train.

As you say, it's a hobby: we should enjoy it, but if people set rules, it helps if they are clear.

Maybe, as you suggest, the 'ENGINES and rolling stock' section of this forum might be more appropriate 8-)
 

gerryclarke

Joined: 1-01-97

Topics: 5

Replies: 10

Posted: Tue 16th May 2017, 11:08am

George I wonder what train of thought brought you to mention this topic, perhaps you were looking at the rear of a wedding dress flowing gracefully behind the bride or asking someone with a very obedient dog how did you train it? Although I agree with both you and the Rev Awdry unfortunately modern railway practice has adopted another means of traction whereby each vehicle has its own motor so in this case what word should we use.
 

George Coles

Joined: 4-08-09

Topics: 19

Replies: 90

Posted: Tue 16th May 2017, 9:02pm

Gerry, my 'big railway' colleagues tell me the correct term is 'unit'.
 

gerryclarke

Joined: 1-01-97

Topics: 5

Replies: 10

Posted: Wed 17th May 2017, 8:19am

Thank you George.
From now on I will use Locomotive, Train, Engine and Unit hopefully in the correct context.
 
 
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