Forum Options

« Back to Miscellaneous Topics Topics

Sign In above to begin adding replies.
 

What are the rules about wearing Hi-Vis when operating in public spaces

ivanhewlett

Joined: 1-01-85

Topics: 8

Replies: 53

Posted: Sun 4th Dec 2016, 6:45pm
What are the rules about wearing Hi-Vis when operating in public spaces

Hi All
As you may know the Riverside Miniature Railway is being established in a public park in St Neots, Cambridgeshire.
There is a view that we should wear hi-vis when working on site, does anyone know what the law says around this please. Of course when we are using diggers or similar machinery it makes sense so that the public are aware of our presence and we know who is working with dangerous plant. But when we are operating trains is it necessary for us to wearing Hi-Vis - and if so for what purpose ?

I think that is the basis of my question, what does the wearing of Hi-Vis infer of the wearer ?

Personally I am find Hi-Vis largely incompatible with the character of miniature railways, but if there is a good argument for its use then I will of course comply, but I would welcome others views please ?

If I am driving a train in Hi-Vis does it really add any value, surely if I am driving the train regardless of what I am wearing it is clear that I am a responsible person ?

Thanks in advance for thoughts and advice.

Regards, Ivan (1065)
 

Replies To This Post

Peter Beevers

Joined: 9-10-01

Topics: 3

Replies: 134

Posted: Mon 5th Dec 2016, 8:06am

Rules? There are no rules, there is (in current terms) simply risk assessment of the function you wish to perform and the risks you wish to mitigate.
A hi-vis jacket is a personal safety item. It is there for use when someone is doing something you might not expect, and they are doing something where their personal safety is compromised by large, heavy moving vehicles close by.
So, on full size, anyone going on or near the track must wear one so that if they have a forgetful moment, they can be seen and hopefully warned when a train is coming. Similarly road workers, bus drivers getting out to check their vehicle etc.
However, I would say that they have no material use in our context, and they look very obtrusive. Our council prefers our members to wear uniform so that they stand out, but they (and the local police) are quite happy that we drive without because - well, it's a railway track, and trains come down it, don't they.
I do understand that our park is very open - but even in he event of it being less so, signage and appropriate train speed/use of warning devices are much more effective for keeping the public safe.
Finally, and from a purely personal view, if anyone insisted that I wear a hi vis vest while driving a miniature steam loco I would tell them where to put it, as it is totally inappropriate there!!
Not that I have any strong views on this, of course. . . . .
 

ivanhewlett

Joined: 1-01-85

Topics: 8

Replies: 53

Posted: Mon 5th Dec 2016, 10:09am

Hi Peter
Thanks for picking up on my question - and for your reply - I don't think I am in any doubt as to your thoughts on this :-)
I am in total agreement with your thinking actually, but I wanted some feedback in respect of what is already happening on similar lines - your line is exactly that (albeit a bit bigger than the RMR)and so your feedback is really useful, thanks.
I suspect that our track teams may be required to wear Hi-Vis, particularly as we will be using diggers/dumpers during construction, but while operating I hope we can keep Hi-Vis to a minimum.
Thanks again and catch up soon.
Kind Regards, Ivan
 

johndoyle

Joined: 15-12-99

Topics: 6

Replies: 21

Posted: Mon 5th Dec 2016, 1:27pm

Hi Ivan

Hi Viz jackets are for one purpose only - to make you highly visible!  This means it is safer for the wearer, as others, such as operators of diggers or drivers of (insert trains, planes, cars, buses etc) can see where you are.

Peter is quite correct in that they are a good idea when working with machinery, but are less important for everyday operations on a miniature railway - unless your risk assessment identifies otherwise.

Like Peter, at Halton we operate in a public park.  We have orange hi-Viz vests that members do tend to wear.  These have our railway name printed on the back, and are an easy way for members of the public to identify who is involved with the railway.  Not all members wear them, I usually don't, neither do some of the drivers who are in overalls.

The local council have no real opinion on the subject, and I've never discussed it with the boys in blue! 

Having said all that, some people really like to wear a hi viz as it gives them a sense of belonging (and importance)!


John Doyle
Halton Miniature Railway
Hi Ivan

Hi Viz jackets are for one purpose only - to make you highly visible! This means it is safer for the wearer, as others, such as operators of diggers or drivers of (insert trains, planes, cars, buses etc) can see where you are.

Peter is quite correct in that they are a good idea when working with machinery, but are less important for everyday operations on a miniature railway - unless your risk assessment identifies otherwise.

Like Peter, at Halton we operate in a public park. We have orange hi-Viz vests that members do tend to wear. These have our railway name printed on the back, and are an easy way for members of the public to identify who is involved with the railway. Not all members wear them, I usually don't, neither do some of the drivers who are in overalls.

The local council have no real opinion on the subject, and I've never discussed it with the boys in blue!

Having said all that, some people really like to wear a hi viz as it gives them a sense of belonging (and importance)!


John Doyle
Halton Miniature Railway
 

PeteW

Joined: 1-10-13

Topics: 0

Replies: 21

Posted: Mon 5th Dec 2016, 1:30pm

I attend the very busy rallies at Llanelli twice a year and their staff working alongside the track wear these jackets. Visitors like me know instantly who to ask for advice and they clearly stand out when you are driving. Seems sensible to me!

Pete.
 

colinedmondson

Joined: 9-08-09

Topics: 3

Replies: 82

Posted: Wed 7th Dec 2016, 10:10am

Personally I don't like them, but if the railway name is printed on the back they do identify the wearer as a part of the team and likely to be able to help a member of the public. Perhaps they also help the team spirit, a sense of belonging?
 

Xz

Joined: 1-01-92

Topics: 17

Replies: 244

Posted: Wed 7th Dec 2016, 11:44am

I've always found a grease-top and/or a pair of overalls to be sufficient identification.
 

ivanhewlett

Joined: 1-01-85

Topics: 8

Replies: 53

Posted: Fri 9th Dec 2016, 8:56am

Hi All
Thanks for your replies, they are all really appreciated and valued.

Ours is a new club and we want to operate to the highest standards of the hobby, this includes respect for health and safety, but also the traditions of miniature railways and model engineering. I also recognise that it is important to value the rights of the individual - and there are some of our membership who will wear Hi-Vis for many of the reasons that John identifies.
I, on the other hand, tend to find Hi-Vis intrusive to the character of miniature railways and struggle to understand how they would have really benfitted myself, or others, in the 40 or so years I have been around miniature lines.
But I do understand that they have a place in the modern world and if I am working with plant or acting as 'responsible person' on operating days then I will wear an RMR branded Hi-Vis. What I don't want is to feel that when I am driving or otherwise participating in low risk railway roles that I will be in any way mandated to wear them.
From your replies I don't think I am alone in this respect ?

Thanks again.

Kind Regards, Ivan
 

PeteW

Joined: 1-10-13

Topics: 0

Replies: 21

Posted: Fri 9th Dec 2016, 9:53am

Why not address the actual risk? If it is a day for members only the hi-viz is off. If the public are due, and/or lots of visiting locos, out comes the hi-viz.

Pete.
 

johndoyle

Joined: 15-12-99

Topics: 6

Replies: 21

Posted: Fri 9th Dec 2016, 2:33pm

Ivan,

your RISK ASSESSMENT will identify when you must wear a hi-Viz (and safety clothing such as steel toe shoes etc).

Otherwise it is down to your club OPERATING POLICY to state when they are required; for example all junior members should wear one to make it clear which children are involved with the club (and can be in a 'restricted' area) and those that are not.

Remember it is our hobby, keep restrictions and rules to a minimum, and don't worry too much what other people like to wear. For some, spending hours tinkering with an oily engine is fun, for others wearing an orange jacket means they're involved.

John
Halton Miniature Railway
 

ivanhewlett

Joined: 1-01-85

Topics: 8

Replies: 53

Posted: Sat 10th Dec 2016, 5:07pm

Hi John

Fair points, well made - thank you :-)

This has been a good discussion and I am really grateful for everyones thoughts.

Kind Regards, Ivan
 

ivanhewlett

Joined: 1-01-85

Topics: 8

Replies: 53

Posted: Sat 10th Dec 2016, 5:07pm

Hi John

Fair points, well made - thank you :-)

This has been a good discussion and I am really grateful for everyones thoughts.

Kind Regards, Ivan
 

iaindinnes

Joined: 1-01-85

Topics: 0

Replies: 1

Posted: Thu 29th Dec 2016, 10:04am

Hi Ivan

I know that EHMR is not quite in the same type of location as you but...
Most members tend to were the logo'd polo shirts, some members also have bought boilersuits or drivers jackets with the embroidered logo, this we view is sufficient identification for normal operation (and giving price enquiries in the garden centre).
For special running days there are also Hi Viz tabards available to identify who is in overal charge of the railway (Yellow) and those involved in running the signals / shunting (Blue) all logo'd and identified in back of vest.
These odd colours for railways were chosen as some visitors do turn up with orange HiViz from their railways.

We also have some Green Hi Viz Vests which are used for station staff, these are used when we are busy on the platform or when someone who is not in a logo'd top is working on the station.

Iain
 
 
« Back to Miscellaneous Topics Topics

Web design by Slingshot