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What is your Society's Annual Membership Fee?

Simon J

Joined: 19-09-05

Topics: 9

Replies: 11

Posted: Tue 9th Sep 2014, 4:51pm
What is your Society's Annual Membership Fee?

Hello.

I hope that you can help me. I am attempting to put together a list of the annual membership fees that societies charge.

For example, I am a member of the Cambridge Model Engineering Society and our membeship fees are £30 for waged and £20 for unwaged. We supplement our income by opening to the public on 7 occasions a year.

Are these membership fees typical or do you pay more (and don't open to the public?) or less?

Thank you in advance.

Simon Jones
 

Replies To This Post

frankcooper

Joined: 9-08-09

Topics: 9

Replies: 58

Posted: Tue 9th Sep 2014, 5:09pm

My club is flat £30 but we also raise money through monthly Open Days and Birthday parties, plus catering.
 

ivanhewlett

Joined: 1-01-85

Topics: 8

Replies: 53

Posted: Tue 9th Sep 2014, 6:23pm

Hi All

This is another interesting question for a number of reasons, but I think a general question in response would be 'what is wrong with the cost plus model'?
ie: what does it cost to support a person as a member, insurance, newsletters and postage, etc. etc. then if you wish add something towards funds, but this should be made clear.
I struggle to understand how cost plus has become so passe when at its basis it seems so simple.

Cheers, Ivan.
 

frankcooper

Joined: 9-08-09

Topics: 9

Replies: 58

Posted: Tue 9th Sep 2014, 6:58pm

The £30 just covers the annual Insurance bill which is over £1,000 - the rest of the income goes to track work, ballast, repairs, new carriages etc. Our electric bill is over £400 a year alone.
 

MartynRedfearn

Joined: 1-01-94

Topics: 16

Replies: 107

Posted: Tue 9th Sep 2014, 7:01pm

Ours is £50 based on members fees covering all the basics, we do public open day and birthdays which then pays for improvements to the site
 

Richard_Langford

Joined: 1-01-70

Topics: 10

Replies: 37

Posted: Tue 9th Sep 2014, 8:24pm

Brighouse is £50 and Spenborough is £25.
 

Simon J

Joined: 19-09-05

Topics: 9

Replies: 11

Posted: Wed 10th Sep 2014, 9:45am

Thank you all for your comments.

The income which we get from membership is, like others have said, insufficient to run our society for a year. A quick, back of the envelope calculation, suggests that we would have to increase our membership fees by several times to receive enough income to do that.

I notice that the 7 1/4" Gauge Society now have adopted, if I've understood it correctly, a 'cost plus' membership basis with the basic membership cost being the eMember and 'ordinary members' paying the supplement for the printed material.

Simon
 

johnnicholson

Joined: 1-01-77

Topics: 12

Replies: 69

Posted: Thu 11th Sep 2014, 1:58pm

I am a member of Bradford MES and this year our fees were £35.00? but there is a reduced fee for senior citizens. The Society also have to pay rent for two sites in Bradford and this accounts for a chunk of our subscription.
John Nicholson
 

Peter Beevers

Joined: 9-10-01

Topics: 3

Replies: 134

Posted: Thu 11th Sep 2014, 4:29pm

Ours is free. However, we are a society that exists purely to run a railway in a council park. Our railway opens over 100 days a year, and all members are expected to work on the railway several days a year, as well as doing winter track work.
 

johndoyle

Joined: 15-12-99

Topics: 6

Replies: 21

Posted: Sat 13th Sep 2014, 10:35am

At Halton we charge £10 per year for adults, and £1 for juniors. Main income is from running trains.

Peter - as you don't charge, can anyone just join or do you apply and are accepted? What happens if someone doesn't help out during the year?
 

Peter Beevers

Joined: 9-10-01

Topics: 3

Replies: 134

Posted: Sat 13th Sep 2014, 8:02pm

John, you have to apply and be accepted. We normally don't accept people until they have visited us several times. If people don't help run the railway, we simply terminate their membership.
 

Vulcan

Joined: 10-01-09

Topics: 1

Replies: 8

Posted: Mon 24th Nov 2014, 1:18pm

Rugby MES (Rainsbrook Valley Railway) charge £45.00 p.a to the over 21s.
Reduced rates are available for juniors.
Income is supplemented by public open days and running children's birthday parties.
The basic subscription probably doesn't even cover the rent, insurance,and electricity costs.
 

rogerbrown

Joined: 1-01-85

Topics: 6

Replies: 35

Posted: Fri 26th Dec 2014, 11:02am

Simon

At East Herts we charge £16 per annum for Adults and £8 for Juniors, this covers the cots of running the Society - members insurance; boiler testers insurance and postage. The rest of money comes from the proceeds of carrying passengers and that covers the cost of maintaining the railway, maintenance of locos and rolling stock; development and improvement of the railway.

We are lucky at East Hers in some aspects that we do have a good income from running the railway as we currently have rent of £5000 per year plus insurance of over £3500, so without this income our membership fees would have to be rather expensive.

I also belong to Chingford MES and there fees are £25 per annum.

Regards

Roger

 

Mick

Joined: 1-01-89

Topics: 7

Replies: 114

Posted: Sat 27th Dec 2014, 8:34am

There is a key issue underlying this question: should a society's miniature railway subsidise all the society members? If your society is purely a miniature railway, then the situation is clear. However most of us are in a model engineering society. In the case of my own club, there is a large proportion of members who enjoy all the benefits of membership without ever being involved with the railway so their only contribution is their membership fee. We therefore decided a couple of years ago to work out the real cost of membership, without the subsidy from the railway. It came around the £60 p.a. mark! We increased the membership fee from the then £12 p.a. to £30, as a leap to the real cost seemed to much! Nevertheless it will be reviewed annually and may well be increased again as the income from the railway is reinvested in its rolling stock and infrastructure.
 

Xz

Joined: 1-01-92

Topics: 17

Replies: 244

Posted: Sat 27th Dec 2014, 9:38am

Good point Mick; there is an alternative, railway running days could be manned by rota, such as at one club I used to belong to. Only the infirm were excused duty, and if you couldn't make your slot you had to find your own replacement. However the drawback to that system is that somehow it still has to be policed, and what can you use to sanction those who repeatedly fail to turn up. It actually worked out that each member only had about three duty turns per season (May-Oct), so it wasn't too arduous. Perhaps more of a problem if there is only a small membership.
 

Peter Beevers

Joined: 9-10-01

Topics: 3

Replies: 134

Posted: Sat 27th Dec 2014, 12:10pm

You guys have hit it on the head - we run our railway on a rota, no excuses. But it's very hard work for the roster clerk who everyone thinks is constantly badgering them for more days, and, having twisted peoples arms to get them to drive, persuading them to help on winter maintenance projects is VERY hard indeed. The truth is with most of our societies that there is a core of us who end up doing most of the work and the rest do whatever they can/want to. I must admit, Mick's suggestion of a high fee is more and more appealing every day . . . .
 
 
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