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Loading and Off Loading

billhaywood

Joined: 22-05-03

Topics: 17

Replies: 30

Posted: Sun 5th Jan 2014, 9:58pm
Loading and Off Loading

There must be various ways and methods of moving a locomotive or coach from a road vehicle to track.
What form of loading do you have or know of. Photographs could be useful.
 

Replies To This Post

Xz

Joined: 1-01-92

Topics: 17

Replies: 244

Posted: Sun 5th Jan 2014, 10:59pm

The best I've seen is a flat steel plate with a "V" shaped guide on it, set to collect and line up the flanges with the rails. The loco slides easily across the plate as required.
 

rogerbrown

Joined: 1-01-85

Topics: 6

Replies: 35

Posted: Sun 5th Jan 2014, 11:02pm

Billy

At the railway I am a member of we have installed a hydraulic lifting platform which has a two ton capacity. However other railways that I have visited have used a variety of methods, some use a ramp, some off load onto raised tracks, where the road level is below track level and then they use a short bridging piece of track and plenty of others use hydraulic lift tables. It all boils down on what clubs can afford or obtain.

Regards and happy new new year

Roger Brown
Member 1066
 

Peter Beevers

Joined: 9-10-01

Topics: 3

Replies: 134

Posted: Mon 6th Jan 2014, 9:57am

A ramp (which can be combined with dropping the road surface to avoid having to go too high) with a fishtail at the end (As XZ talks about) is the easiest cost effective way. I have easily unloaded 3/4 ton worth of loco this way.
The hydraulic lift is the Rolls Royce solution - I used the one at Woking once and it was VERY easy - but of course, Rolls Royces cost a lot of money (and have a lot of expensive parts to go wrong!!)
 

MartynRedfearn

Joined: 1-01-94

Topics: 16

Replies: 107

Posted: Mon 6th Jan 2014, 1:33pm

We have both hydraulic lift and ramp at Brighouse, hydraulic is great for shorter stuff ramp much better for longer locos.  I agree a plate and V is the best way to go, out hydraulic lift has flat plat on top with the V on the ground leading to the track.  I have my own ramp with V plate at the bottom so that I can load from ground.

Can I also suggest making sure there is plenty of room to reverse up to the ramp including either side as some trailers are pretty wide.
We have both hydraulic lift and ramp at Brighouse, hydraulic is great for shorter stuff ramp much better for longer locos. I agree a plate and V is the best way to go, out hydraulic lift has flat plat on top with the V on the ground leading to the track. I have my own ramp with V plate at the bottom so that I can load from ground.

Can I also suggest making sure there is plenty of room to reverse up to the ramp including either side as some trailers are pretty wide.
 

MartynRedfearn

Joined: 1-01-94

Topics: 16

Replies: 107

Posted: Mon 6th Jan 2014, 6:49pm

In this picture the hydraulic lift is under the ramp, as 4701 'Tangoed' is too long for it.
In this picture the hydraulic lift is under the ramp, as 4701 'Tangoed' is too long for it.
 

MartynRedfearn

Joined: 1-01-94

Topics: 16

Replies: 107

Posted: Mon 6th Jan 2014, 6:59pm

One big advantage of a hydraulic lift is it is very useful when you want to get a loco to a suitable working height
One big advantage of a hydraulic lift is it is very useful when you want to get a loco to a suitable working height
 

colinedmondson

Joined: 9-08-09

Topics: 3

Replies: 82

Posted: Mon 6th Jan 2014, 8:47pm

I have a ramp that clips onto the back of the trailer and allows me to unload straight onto the track. With a winch on the trailer it makes me totally independent of track facilities (or lack of). Does remove some paint from beneath the buffer beams, though.
I have a ramp that clips onto the back of the trailer and allows me to unload straight onto the track. With a winch on the trailer it makes me totally independent of track facilities (or lack of). Does remove some paint from beneath the buffer beams, though.
 

Railrose

Joined: 25-06-07

Topics: 1

Replies: 8

Posted: Wed 8th Jan 2014, 1:13pm

My loading ramp was made by Willem van der Heiden, builder of Nestor, a romulus like engine. It consists of a pivot on a stool, about half the average trailer or van floor heigth, a piece of rail of about 2 meter long and a steel plate, about 4 mm thick. It's made some 35 years ago and turned out to be very versatile. You push the engine on, until it's right above the pivot. Then gently lift the end of the rail, with the steel plate, and turn around until close to vehicle, lift the rail more (gently, don't tip over) and rest the end on the edge of the vehicle floor. The steel plate will now provide a smooth roll in. Beware of stray cats...
My loading ramp was made by Willem van der Heiden, builder of Nestor, a romulus like engine. It consists of a pivot on a stool, about half the average trailer or van floor heigth, a piece of rail of about 2 meter long and a steel plate, about 4 mm thick. It's made some 35 years ago and turned out to be very versatile. You push the engine on, until it's right above the pivot. Then gently lift the end of the rail, with the steel plate, and turn around until close to vehicle, lift the rail more (gently, don't tip over) and rest the end on the edge of the vehicle floor. The steel plate will now provide a smooth roll in. Beware of stray cats...
 

Railrose

Joined: 25-06-07

Topics: 1

Replies: 8

Posted: Wed 8th Jan 2014, 1:22pm

After a half turn, the engine can be pushed in. You don't have to be straight in line with the tracks, it also works at different angles from the track. In the pictures (could only upload one in a reply) my petrol mechanic Panter is on it, at our club we use it with different engines, though it is not really suitable for a 4-6-0, because of its length the centre of gravity is too far from the pivot, it takes some wrestle power.

The top of the stool is a rond steel plate, about 20 cm diameter with a 12 mm pin in the middle. Near one end the rail has a square plate with a hole in it, and a bar on the short end to prevent the engine from falling off, though brakes need to be applied.

At our club track (Maasoever Spoorweg) in Barendrecht we have a hydraulic lift, but that one is a little too heavy to carry along. 

And best wishes to all

Rosie
After a half turn, the engine can be pushed in. You don't have to be straight in line with the tracks, it also works at different angles from the track. In the pictures (could only upload one in a reply) my petrol mechanic Panter is on it, at our club we use it with different engines, though it is not really suitable for a 4-6-0, because of its length the centre of gravity is too far from the pivot, it takes some wrestle power.

The top of the stool is a rond steel plate, about 20 cm diameter with a 12 mm pin in the middle. Near one end the rail has a square plate with a hole in it, and a bar on the short end to prevent the engine from falling off, though brakes need to be applied.

At our club track (Maasoever Spoorweg) in Barendrecht we have a hydraulic lift, but that one is a little too heavy to carry along.

And best wishes to all

Rosie
 

George

Joined: 27-01-10

Topics: 0

Replies: 20

Posted: Wed 8th Jan 2014, 4:28pm

As an extra to railrose her report. I have used that same contraption to unload my Titan7 from the of my Touran and at an odd angle to the track because the hydraulic lift at the time was inaccessibel.
By the way unloading bay is easily wide enough because the lift can move sideways on It's own track so allways in line.
Regards George,
Ps. sorry for the typos but my iPad is set on dutch and then english can be difficult to achieve.
 

John

Joined: 23-09-06

Topics: 0

Replies: 5

Posted: Tue 14th Jan 2014, 5:18pm

I think this is the ramp refered to by Xz . Saw this one at Comrie and slavishly copied it! Works well with my Tinkerbell sized locos .

John
I think this is the ramp refered to by Xz . Saw this one at Comrie and slavishly copied it! Works well with my Tinkerbell sized locos .

John
 
 
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