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Loading gauge

Slowcoach

Joined: 1-01-77

Topics: 2

Replies: 12

Posted: Sun 12th Jun 2016, 6:23pm
Loading gauge

Where can I find the Society "approved" loading gauge. It was in the News some years ago but it must be somewhere handier.

Jack 191
 

Replies To This Post

Xz

Joined: 1-01-92

Topics: 17

Replies: 244

Posted: Sun 12th Jun 2016, 7:33pm

As far as I know there is no Society standard for loading gauge. 'Loading gauge' being the width and height of rolling stock, for clearance through tunnels and under bridges.

Track/wheel standards, and coupling heights etc., can be found under "About Us".
 

Peter Beevers

Joined: 9-10-01

Topics: 3

Replies: 134

Posted: Sun 12th Jun 2016, 7:41pm

HSG216 contains guidance on this - or rather, an envelope for bridges, tunnels etc. The only point I would make is that average widths have gone up since it was written.
 

Slowcoach

Joined: 1-01-77

Topics: 2

Replies: 12

Posted: Mon 13th Jun 2016, 9:32am

Many thanks for your prompt replies. I remember that, years ago, we published some "envelope" dimensions in the News. You've reminded me that the Society worked up a set of rules/guidance that was adopted by the RI/HSE. I'll get the latest issue of HSG216 and go from there. I'm interessted to see that average widths have increased over the years. Have these been formalised in any way within the Society?

Jack
 

Peter Beevers

Joined: 9-10-01

Topics: 3

Replies: 134

Posted: Mon 13th Jun 2016, 8:57pm

Formalised?? Probably not. But if it were me, I'd assume 30" wide stock (max) and allow for the inswing of a vehicle 10' long.
 

Mick

Joined: 1-01-89

Topics: 7

Replies: 114

Posted: Tue 14th Jun 2016, 8:22am

The height of a driver sitting on a narrow gauge tender or riding car also needs to be taken into consideration to prevent striking your head on a tunnel roof or gantry.
On full size railways the loading gauge is more about height than anything else! Attached a photo of the tunnel at the Beer Heights Light Railway (2016 AGM venue). This tunnel has enough height and width to allow walking out alongside a stationary train, plus emergency lighting.
The height of a driver sitting on a narrow gauge tender or riding car also needs to be taken into consideration to prevent striking your head on a tunnel roof or gantry.
On full size railways the loading gauge is more about height than anything else! Attached a photo of the tunnel at the Beer Heights Light Railway (2016 AGM venue). This tunnel has enough height and width to allow walking out alongside a stationary train, plus emergency lighting.
 

Slowcoach

Joined: 1-01-77

Topics: 2

Replies: 12

Posted: Tue 14th Jun 2016, 2:57pm

Gentlemen,

Interestingly, I have found my copy of HSE/RI Technical Note TN3 which is probably the precursor of HSG 216. My enquiry concerns clearance of feet projecting from a vehicle when the rider (driver) is sitting sideways. It seems the only likely problem is at low level platforms where the clearance may be as little as 50mm. This has to be reconciled with the vehicle centreline to side dimension which may bring the footrest away from the platform.
All other dimensions are more than adequate.
I have an enquiry in with the HSE at Basingstoke regarding HSG 216. I'll post the outcome in due course.

Jack
 

billhaywood

Joined: 22-05-03

Topics: 17

Replies: 30

Posted: Tue 14th Jun 2016, 5:30pm

Hi Jack,
I would keep platform level no higher than rail height which will minimize entrapment to feet.
Hi Jack,
I would keep platform level no higher than rail height which will minimize entrapment to feet.
 

Xz

Joined: 1-01-92

Topics: 17

Replies: 244

Posted: Tue 14th Jun 2016, 6:56pm

HSG 216 is no longer a 'supported' document, and hasn't been for some years.
 

Slowcoach

Joined: 1-01-77

Topics: 2

Replies: 12

Posted: Wed 15th Jun 2016, 8:50am

The reason for my posting is that I'm planning to buy a Maxitrak Hudson. This loco has a sideways facing seat and a footboard along the side. Illustrations on the website shows the driver's feet protruding beyond the edge of the footboard. My concern has been the possibility of the driver's feet striking lineside infrastructure, etc.
Does anyone have experience of using a Hudson "sidesaddle" and any problems with feet sticking out? It will be used on club tracks so I won't be able to control platform heights or infrastructure clearances.
 

Peter Beevers

Joined: 9-10-01

Topics: 3

Replies: 134

Posted: Wed 15th Jun 2016, 2:53pm

Now I see why you're worried. Looking at it, it's a very poor design, with your feet very exposed. I have built three petrol/diesel hydraulic 0-4-0's for various people and they have a much better floor plan, by using a seat from Ikea which has a simple column to support it. Therefore, your feet are totally within the loco and the problem does not occur. My seats will also turn round, so you can face either way easily.
Now I see why you're worried. Looking at it, it's a very poor design, with your feet very exposed. I have built three petrol/diesel hydraulic 0-4-0's for various people and they have a much better floor plan, by using a seat from Ikea which has a simple column to support it. Therefore, your feet are totally within the loco and the problem does not occur. My seats will also turn round, so you can face either way easily.
 

Peter Beevers

Joined: 9-10-01

Topics: 3

Replies: 134

Posted: Wed 15th Jun 2016, 2:57pm

Another photo from behind which perhaps shows what I'm talking about a bit better.
Another photo from behind which perhaps shows what I'm talking about a bit better.
 

Slowcoach

Joined: 1-01-77

Topics: 2

Replies: 12

Posted: Thu 16th Jun 2016, 5:23pm

Peter,

Many thanks for your reply and interest in my problem. Your design is really what I would make - including the cab. It shows it is possible.
To be fair, the Maxitrak design is many years old and, speaking to them yesterday, they've not had any reports of feet getting mixed up with passing infrastructure. They've made about 10 Hudson model locos in that time. So, it doesn't seem to be a problem.

Thanks again

Jack
 

Slowcoach

Joined: 1-01-77

Topics: 2

Replies: 12

Posted: Fri 17th Jun 2016, 3:48pm

Saw the Hudson at Bekonscot Model Village this morning. Having seen it in the flesh, I realise it is not what I'm looking for. And, even with smallish feet, my toes still hung beyond the loco anyway. I have identified a possible other supplier.
 

George

Joined: 27-01-10

Topics: 0

Replies: 20

Posted: Fri 17th Jun 2016, 7:58pm

I am truly sorry but I do not concur and hence I am compelled to respond.
A club track, so also for visitors, should be safe for all as a matter of principle. This means that any obstructions have to at or below rail height for a reasonable distance from the track.
Why am I so adamant about this? At the club of which I am member we had an accident last year. One of our members was driving sitting slightly sideways to keep an eye on the passengers and one foot sticking out. There was stone lining the track which caught the foot. Consequence, one broken ankle.
Obviously since then the lining has been lowered. But we also have a responsibility to our passengers some (most) of them very young. They have a tendency to reach out. Nettles and bushes have some give (still as far as possible almost a metre from the track) but also a steel bridge and gate that were within easy reach we have altered so that you can no longer reach from the train. Maybe it's less model like but surely in the current (liability) climate better safe then sorry.
And then we don't have an HSE that looks at our hobby. Still for some this may serve as a warning. With your HSE I would expect that for most this will be nothing new.
So for the original question about loading gauge, put your arms apart and that should be possible. Now of course you still need to be able to get it through a door for stabling.
Mind you private tracks are completely different.
Regards
George
 

MartynRedfearn

Joined: 1-01-94

Topics: 16

Replies: 107

Posted: Fri 17th Jun 2016, 10:30pm

Sometimes the shed is the limit
Sometimes the shed is the limit
 

Slowcoach

Joined: 1-01-77

Topics: 2

Replies: 12

Posted: Sat 18th Jun 2016, 6:33am

George, I totally agree with your second paragraph but I wouldn't want to travel some distance to visit a track only to find it wasn't built to the standards now applied to your club track. It is interesting that your club had to have an accident to prompt a rethink of clearances. Nowadays, the most likely problem for sideways protruding feet would be platform edges (for NG locos).

Martyn, Interesting pic but the side clearance is more than adequate and the driver's head is protected by the cab roof. Plus, of course, the portal shouldn't be negotiated at anything above a crawl. Food for thought, though.

Meanwhile, thank you all for your interest and for taking the trouble to post replies.

Best wishes

Jack (Member 191)
 
 
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