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P/Way set-up & maintenance: longitudinal 'levelling', super-elevation, etc.

NigelR

Joined: 20-02-13

Topics: 1

Replies: 0

Posted: Sat 16th Jan 2016, 5:33pm
P/Way set-up & maintenance: longitudinal 'levelling', super-elevation, etc.

Hi. Can anyone help me by pointing me towards a high-quality publication on tools, methods & measurement-based procedures for clubs doing initial set-up & regular maintenance of both Longitudinal Leveling (eliminating unwanted ups-and-downs) and Super-Elevation of 7.25" p/way?

There seems to be no good book specifically on the subject.
And so there seems to be no place to go for collected best measurement-based tools and methods.

I suspect this may not be a small topic, so one with much anecdotal and subjective views. If so then perhaps this message may get some replies about your favorite methods and tools.

I am particularly interested is in the tools & measurement-based aspects of this work, as it seems to me that the best repeatibility may be got that way, and maintained too.

Thanks.
 

Replies To This Post

HauteSaoneFrance

Joined: 2-01-14

Topics: 27

Replies: 91

Posted: Sat 16th Jan 2016, 6:13pm

Sounds like a job for a good quality laser level both for set up and dealing with subsidence etc. Why do you need a book for this or have I missed something? Talking laser level pro equipment is not expensive nowadays, wouldn't be without mine and operation is now one man/girl unlike the old days when surveying was always a two person job, What do you mean by 'Super Elevation' ?
 

Xz

Joined: 1-01-92

Topics: 17

Replies: 244

Posted: Sat 16th Jan 2016, 7:23pm

The best available equipment is a mirror! Stand in front with only your head visible, and they are fitted about half way down. There is little need for anything other than a standard spirit level and a good eye. Don't try to make the job any more than it already is - simple.

HSF, Super elevation is the angle that the track lies through a curve. Outer rail slightly higher than the inner. Not really needed except at speed, or tight bends, then only about 1/8" - 3/16" in the middle of the bend.
 

HauteSaoneFrance

Joined: 2-01-14

Topics: 27

Replies: 91

Posted: Sun 17th Jan 2016, 12:48pm

I like the reply Xz High speed (tilting) trains in 7.1/4 maybe not so far in the future? LOL
 

Mike

Joined: 18-07-06

Topics: 2

Replies: 20

Posted: Sun 17th Jan 2016, 6:29pm

Hi Nigel......

Working alone, I need to be able to find, and hold, a low or out of cross level spots for packing.  I've built a little PW wagon fitted with two caravan jacks, a pendulum level and a stadia rod.  I got a laser level set on eBay, and it eliminates my having to walk back and forth to 'eyeball' my work.  The laser level also allows for accurately setting gradients.

Mike
Hi Nigel......

Working alone, I need to be able to find, and hold, a low or out of cross level spots for packing. I've built a little PW wagon fitted with two caravan jacks, a pendulum level and a stadia rod. I got a laser level set on eBay, and it eliminates my having to walk back and forth to 'eyeball' my work. The laser level also allows for accurately setting gradients.

Mike
 

HauteSaoneFrance

Joined: 2-01-14

Topics: 27

Replies: 91

Posted: Sun 17th Jan 2016, 8:12pm

Looks like we are on the same wavelength re levels? Same tripod but a different level instrument mine is from 'RED' survey in Devon, audio and visual so genuinely one girl operation. No book required it's just plain survey procedure as Xz says and the trained eye is pretty good at determining levels and if short of cash to buy a laser the good old water level is pretty good too. Love the neatness of your site not a weed anywhere to be seen
 

Xz

Joined: 1-01-92

Topics: 17

Replies: 244

Posted: Mon 18th Jan 2016, 10:13am

If you have to work alone then you could add a bricky's string-line and a longer straight edge to the list. We're not running HS2, a little bit of 'wobble' is quite acceptable, even adds to the passenger experience.

A simple tool that I made myself, is this wedge, that I use with the 2 foot spirit level to gauge the grade. 1" tall to nothing over 6", and marked with the grades. Push it under the low end 'til the bubble is right, and read.  Grades don't have to be constant, near enough is good enough.
If you have to work alone then you could add a bricky's string-line and a longer straight edge to the list. We're not running HS2, a little bit of 'wobble' is quite acceptable, even adds to the passenger experience.

A simple tool that I made myself, is this wedge, that I use with the 2 foot spirit level to gauge the grade. 1" tall to nothing over 6", and marked with the grades. Push it under the low end 'til the bubble is right, and read. Grades don't have to be constant, near enough is good enough.
 

HauteSaoneFrance

Joined: 2-01-14

Topics: 27

Replies: 91

Posted: Wed 20th Jan 2016, 7:30pm

Seems like you could also use a series of graded wedges pushed under the track transversely to set up for 'super elevation' in order to cope with any new breed of 7.1/4 HST's !
 

JohnFromBentley

Joined: 1-01-80

Topics: 1

Replies: 5

Posted: Thu 18th Feb 2016, 5:54pm

We use a simple arrangement of a mirror set at 45degrees to view track alignment irregularities. The carrying handle can also take a spirit level for quickly checking the 'cant'. Mirror is a 300mm square mirror tile available from DIY stores, the rest is made from timber odds & ends.
We use a simple arrangement of a mirror set at 45degrees to view track alignment irregularities. The carrying handle can also take a spirit level for quickly checking the 'cant'. Mirror is a 300mm square mirror tile available from DIY stores, the rest is made from timber odds & ends.
 

JohnFromBentley

Joined: 1-01-80

Topics: 1

Replies: 5

Posted: Thu 18th Feb 2016, 5:56pm

. . . and this is the view you get!
. . . and this is the view you get!
 

Slowcoach

Joined: 1-01-77

Topics: 2

Replies: 12

Posted: Sat 18th Jun 2016, 7:02am

You wanted a good quality literary source of information on track laying. May I recommend the 7 1/4"G News?. Check through the Index(es) to find the subject. I have the News from Issue 0 and know there are articles going back to the late 1970s on track laying.

Jack
 
 
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