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Remote Control to Points

billhaywood

Joined: 22-05-03

Topics: 17

Replies: 30

Posted: Fri 9th Aug 2013, 8:24am
Remote Control to Points

Remote Control to Points
I have a set of points part way up a 1:50ish curved gradient that when I stop the train to change them, the problem comes in getting the train moving again.
Would like to change the points with a device to be located just after crossing a bridge where the gradient starts and avoid stopping to keep momentum going.
I am thinking towards a token or push button device perhaps.
Has anyone got ideas what to use or do and what to purchase from where.
 

Replies To This Post

dennisrayner

Joined: 1-01-94

Topics: 0

Replies: 7

Posted: Fri 9th Aug 2013, 11:22am

I had exactly the same problem except my gradient was 1:25 ish. I used some remote control door actuators bought on ebay for about £25. The operating range is at least 50 feet. I have uploaded a couple of photos to the gallery to illustrate but one of them should appear here if I've done it correctly.
I had exactly the same problem except my gradient was 1:25 ish. I used some remote control door actuators bought on ebay for about £25. The operating range is at least 50 feet. I have uploaded a couple of photos to the gallery to illustrate but one of them should appear here if I've done it correctly.
 

johnbailiss

Joined: 1-01-87

Topics: 5

Replies: 4

Posted: Tue 20th Aug 2013, 9:19pm

Try  a 12 volt actuator very easy to fit, see pic.
Call 0116 2861014

john bailiss
Try a 12 volt actuator very easy to fit, see pic.
Call 0116 2861014

john bailiss
 

Chris B

Joined: 1-01-70

Topics: 2

Replies: 17

Posted: Wed 21st Aug 2013, 7:24am

At the Lincoln M.E.S. track I designed a point motor assembly based around a similar linear actuator to that shown in the previous post. It features spring travel protection in the case od the point blades becoming obstructed (ballast or similar getting between the blades) and limit switches to confirm point travel bak to the signal box. I will take a pic next time I go to the track.
 

Oz

Joined: 1-01-70

Topics: 1

Replies: 1

Posted: Fri 6th Sep 2013, 7:18pm

With both of the potential solutions suggested what happens when you trail through in the opposite direction.
 

dennisrayner

Joined: 1-01-94

Topics: 0

Replies: 7

Posted: Fri 6th Sep 2013, 8:53pm

For my setup - same as on the full size when you go through locked points the wrong way. ie something gets bent or broken. Then we would have an inquiry as to why it happened.

So we don't do it - bad practice !
 

MartynRedfearn

Joined: 1-01-94

Topics: 16

Replies: 107

Posted: Sat 7th Sep 2013, 6:02am

Dennis it is not a lot of good having to stop you enjoyment of playing trains to repair track
 

Mick

Joined: 1-01-89

Topics: 7

Replies: 114

Posted: Sat 7th Sep 2013, 7:34am

It is perfectly feasible, and normal practice on miniature and in places full size railways, to be able to trail through a point. Locking is only needed for travel in the facing direction to ensure there isn't a derailment and to put you on the correct route. A spring mechanism in the operating bar is all that's needed. The photo shows a hand operated point at Abbeydale's Woodside Carriage depot, but the principle is the same and used on our powered pointwork.
It is perfectly feasible, and normal practice on miniature and in places full size railways, to be able to trail through a point. Locking is only needed for travel in the facing direction to ensure there isn't a derailment and to put you on the correct route. A spring mechanism in the operating bar is all that's needed. The photo shows a hand operated point at Abbeydale's Woodside Carriage depot, but the principle is the same and used on our powered pointwork.
 

dennisrayner

Joined: 1-01-94

Topics: 0

Replies: 7

Posted: Sat 7th Sep 2013, 7:37am

Perhaps I should have pointed out the microswitches in the picture which detect the postion of the points and operate route indicating signals. It's a back garden railway operated by myself, my son and grandchildren and we have never had a run through. The normal movement is in a facing direction and I took the decision at the beginning that locked ponts would be better than sprung.
 

Chris B

Joined: 1-01-70

Topics: 2

Replies: 17

Posted: Sat 7th Sep 2013, 8:55am

As I said in my original posting our point motor system has a pair of opposed springs that have sufficient compression left to allow the motor to travel fully if the blades are obstructed. This means that the points could be trailed if the spring rate was suitable (We use quite strong springs to give a positive location in the facing direction)
 

Chris B

Joined: 1-01-70

Topics: 2

Replies: 17

Posted: Thu 26th Sep 2013, 11:27am

Remembered to take the lid off one of our point motors today, so took a picture of the actuator and mechanism.
Remembered to take the lid off one of our point motors today, so took a picture of the actuator and mechanism.
 

colinedmondson

Joined: 9-08-09

Topics: 3

Replies: 82

Posted: Thu 26th Sep 2013, 7:10pm

High Legh has a post mounted switch about two train lengths before the point. This means that if a passenger in the back of the train leans out and changes the points they will have time to change fully before the loco reaches them, rather than under the train. The signal is operated by limit switches which detect the full throw has been achieved.
 

MartynRedfearn

Joined: 1-01-94

Topics: 16

Replies: 107

Posted: Fri 27th Sep 2013, 3:33am

Our new system uses treadles to protect the train, once the button is pressed it cannot be changed until the train hits the appropriate treadle.
 
 
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