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Sleeper spacing

billdadswell

Joined: 1-01-97

Topics: 4

Replies: 7

Posted: Wed 15th Dec 2010, 2:41pm
Sleeper spacing

Could some of those members operating at some of the larger lines with heavy duty track and wooden sleepers advise of the distance you have spaced your sleepers and any problems you have encountered. In the new year we shall be extending our line from the existing steel rail on welded steel sleepers using the equivalent of Fenloe 35 heavy duty aluminium track on treated wood sleepers 3" wide, 2" deep and 16" long. Would a 12" gap be too wide? I suspect it would.
 

Replies To This Post

Xz

Joined: 1-01-92

Topics: 17

Replies: 244

Posted: Wed 15th Dec 2010, 5:50pm

I would say "a little wide". 9" would be supurb. 10" if you're feeling mean about the costs. 3" x 2" is fine, but I hope you will be having the sleepers tanalised. Personnally as I've seen even these rotting out in short order, I would strongly advise using re-cycled plastic.
 

billdadswell

Joined: 1-01-97

Topics: 4

Replies: 7

Posted: Wed 15th Dec 2010, 8:47pm

Hello Bob,
We have tanalised timber and the drainage is substantial so we are hoping they will last some time before replacement is necessary
 

Peter Beevers

Joined: 9-10-01

Topics: 3

Replies: 134

Posted: Thu 16th Dec 2010, 9:33am

Bill,
At Swanley we use similar rail. In the best drained areas, our softwood sleepers lasted nearly 20 years before they needed replacement. Clearly, cost is a major driver - as is the intended usage (size/weight/wheel configuration of locomotives plus volume of traffic) but the principle of needing adequate support at the joins is paramount. We use 16 sleepers per 5 metre straight panel.
Hope this helps,
Peter
 

Graham Burhouse

Joined: 1-01-96

Topics: 4

Replies: 13

Posted: Thu 16th Dec 2010, 11:58am

Hi Bill
I would agree with Peter, we use 80mm x 50mm Heart Wood Larch sleepers that should last at least 25yrs without treatment, but they must be heart wood. Current cost as we have just bought enough for 600 mts of track works out at near enough £1 per sleeper. We use the same sleeper spacing as Peter. If you choose to go down the plastic route make sure you get a really dense plastic as some are full of honycombe, also I recomend you use 75mm square not 50mm as these have a tendancy to bend in hot weather. I think Echils Wood use 75mm, have a word with Jeff he will be able to tell you.
 

billdadswell

Joined: 1-01-97

Topics: 4

Replies: 7

Posted: Fri 17th Dec 2010, 5:30pm

Peter and Graham,
Many thanks for your replies which are most useful
Bill
 

rogerbrown

Joined: 1-01-85

Topics: 6

Replies: 35

Posted: Tue 15th Mar 2011, 10:07pm

at the East Herts Miniature railay we are using 250mm centres for the sleepers and this has proved about right. However we are using 3kg per meter rail, so hoe this helps
 

Jordan Leeds

Joined: 1-01-70

Topics: 3

Replies: 4

Posted: Sat 19th Mar 2011, 1:37am

in my previous line of work i was involved with preperations for a commercial railway where loadings would of been high and traffic frequent we settled on 8" centers using 3"x2" Tanalised sleepers Rail was 4lb steel section secured with Screws and washers
 

billdadswell

Joined: 1-01-97

Topics: 4

Replies: 7

Posted: Mon 21st Mar 2011, 9:24am

Thanks for all the replies. Since this topic was first aired, we have made dozens of track panels at 4.5 metres in length with the tanalised 3" x 2" sleepers at 9" centres. One good thing is that we are using turboscrews from Screwfix to secure the rail to the sleepers. They can be screwed in without pilot holes and have a good area below the bolt head to secure the track without the need for washers. We are using two bolts on the outside and one on the inside of the rail to secure it.
 
 
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